4 Ways To Respond To Judgmental People.

The longer you’re a parent, especially within the foster or adoption circle, the greater the likelihood you will encounter judgmental people. We’ve been through the ringer with this. However, there are a few ways you can respond that puts you in a better place emotionally, physically and spiritually!

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He stared us down from the moment we walked into the Wendy’s restaurant until the moment we left. If glares were audible his would have spewed degrading words through the 20 feet of space that separated us. He wasn’t glaring at our white children. My three younger sons, all white, bounded past him, to the bathroom and he never flinched. They were normal in his eyes. I’ve seen that look a million times in our 14 years of parenting. It was our black children that troubled him.

What The Runner’s World Cover Competition Taught Me About FASD.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder brings about a myriad of struggles for those who suffer from it, and heartache for parents raising children with it. But one competition is changing the face of FASD…

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I am the mother of 5 children who were exposed to alcohol before birth. My children run the full spectrum of affectedness. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is a lifelong condition. Throughout their entire lives they will struggle with a range of difficulties…

Parenting On Purpose Part 3- Parenting With Intention [Podcast]

Season 3, Episode 28- The Honestly Speaking Parenting Podcast

*Editor’s Note- We experienced technical difficulties with the final edit of today’s podcast and had to revert to the original recording from our home church service. We apologize for the audio difference as it was delivered in front of a live audience.

In the Season 3 finale of The Honestly Speaking Parenting Podcast we’re discussing how to parent with intention. Once you’ve learned to establish boundaries for yourself, and healthy boundaries for your children, you must move in a specific direction to see specific results.

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Over the past 14 years of our parenting journey, we’ve learned so many lessons. The biggest lesson is that we are not in control of our child’s life. Of course we guide and lead because that’s our job as parents but, we cannot force them to make wise choices. Try as we may, we are not in control. We are charged with raising our children within boundaries, and with purpose, but at the end of the day their choices are their choices. We must release our grip.

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Why My Job As A Parent Is Not To Control My Child’s Emotions.

As parents, we want the best for our children. Our hearts break when their’s break, our joy soars when theirs soar. When things fall apart, we do our best to fix it. But maybe we’re not supposed to be in control of every emotion they experience.

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“What your mom needs to remember is that she isn’t in control of your emotions.” The counselor was looking right at my daughter but I knew she was talking to me. We had just had a very emotional counseling session. My daughter was asked to list her stressors. I had known for a long time that I was the cause of some of her stress and truthfully I was relieved to see my name at the very bottom of a long and honest list. Watching my daughter make the list was a mixture of sadness, pride and sheer relief.

Parenting On Purpose Part 2- Creating Boundaries For Your Children [Podcast]

Season 3, Episode 27- The Honestly Speaking Parenting Podcast

How do you create and maintain healthy boundaries for your children in a world that is cluttered, distracting, and moving so fast that it’s hard to keep up?

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We learned early on in our parenting that we were not raising children, we were raising future adults. That’s precisely why our boundaries need to compliment this strategy. While I would love to tell you that our children have risen and called us “bless-ed” for the boundaries we’ve set up, they haven’t. Not even close. The Lord above chose to give us with strong-willed children who have pushed every single boundary we’ve created. But, it wouldn’t be called “parenting” if not.

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How To Fight For The Heart Of Your Children [Podcast]

Season 3, Episode 25- The Honestly Speaking Parenting Podcast

It’s a war that rages in every family, but especially foster and adoptive families. The war for the heart of your children. In a fast-paced, ever-changing world, how do you successfully fight and win this battle?

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In 2014 we went through the ringer with our children. We came face to face with the reality that they were falling apart emotionally, spiritually, even physically. Things needed to change, and fast! But how? As we surveyed the landscape of our family we discovered that we were gridlocked in a war. We faced a real and present enemy who was targeting our family, particularly our children.

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To The Man Who Held My Family At Gunpoint.

I believe in face-to-face confrontation. I’ve never been a fan of the open letter concept. However, I’ve been processing some feelings about a recent incident. When I have the chance for confrontation I will take it. If I could speak to him today, this is what I would say to the man who terrified my family.

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To The Man Who Held My Family At Gunpoint,

The day you came to the door, my kids were spending the afternoon with their Grandma. As I left that day something prompted my 7 year old son to ask about the Holy Spirit. “Is the Holy Spirit here?” he asked. “Of course,” I said confidently. “God has a plan for your life and He’s with you all the time.”

10 Powerful Truths About FASD That Will Change Your Perspective.

Editors Note: The Honestly Speaking Parenting Podcast is taking a short break this week but will return next week with a brand new episode.

For the majority of the world, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is misunderstood and often judged. But, there are powerful truths that can change your life when you understand, and embrace them.

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Anger.

That’s the word that comes to mind when I think about FASD. Anger.

I’m angry that my child’s birth mother would make the selfish choice to drink during her pregnancy, angry that the claws of addiction dug deeper than the conviction of pre-natal care, angry at the numerous therapists, doctors, and authorities who’ve downplayed or disagreed with my child’s diagnosis over the years, angry at a world that judges before seeking the truth, and angry when I think about the missing pieces of my child’s life.