What Happens When Birth Parents And Adoptive Parents Support One Another?

The Honestly Adoption Podcast- Season 17, Episode 134

Can birth parents and adoptive parents really enter into a supportive relationship with one another, and put the needs of the child before anything else? Yes! We believe they can. And in today’s episode, you’ll find out why…

If you haven’t met Ashley Mitchell yet, you need to. At age 26 Ashley placed her son for adoption. It was a dark time in her life. She felt a deep sense of loss as she returned home from the hospital without her baby. Would she ever find hope? The answer was yes. But it would be quite the journey. Today, 14 years later, she has become a powerful voice for birth parents, and an advocate for ethical adoptions. You will love her heart and perspective. Listen to the episode…

How The Story Of Your Past Is Not The Story Of Your Future

The Honestly Adoption Podcast- Season 17, Episode 131

Our kids have come from hard places. And often, they can feel as if they’ll never get out from under the weight of those past storylines. But everything they’ve gone through in the past, does not define their future. Embo Tshimanga is living proof of this!

As a youngster, Embo Tshimanga lived in over twenty-five different homes including six homeless shelters, group homes, two women’s shelters, cars, and five foster homes. The norm for her was lack of electricity, water, and food. A ‘shower’ in a gas station bathroom was typical. By the time she graduated high school, she had attended a total of 28 schools. As difficult as this is to read, it was exponentially more difficult to live through. But today, at 21 years old, Embo is shining a bright light and changing the lives of vulnerable children. Listen to her interview…

How A Former Foster Youth Is Telling A Different Adoption Story

The Honestly Adoption Podcast- Season 17, Episode 130

What can a former foster youth teach us about adoption and foster care? A lot! In fact, we believe that adult adoptees and former foster youth are the greatest teachers for foster and adoptive parents. In this interview, we learn a lot!

We are so excited to share our interview with former foster youth, and adoption and foster care advocate, Tori Petersen. She is amazing, and is actively changing the story of adoption and foster care in the United States. She spends her time advocating, on a national level, for better services for children in foster care. Make sure you check out her Instagram here. Listen to the interview….

Thoughts On Adoption From A Transracial Adoptee

The Honestly Adoption Podcast- LEADING VOICES SPOTLIGHT- Season 14, Episode 118

One of the greatest resources for us as adoptive and foster parents is adoptees, and adoptee’s voices. We are fortunate to partner with many adoptees from all ages and walks of life. We have learned so much from them, and will continue to do so. On the latest episode of The Honestly Adoption Podcast we are pleased to welcome transracial adoptee and advocate, Torie DiMartile.

Torie is a transracial adoptee on a lifelong journey toward an integrated and celebrated racial identity. She grew up one of two biracial African American/Caucasian children in a white Italian-American home in Kentucky. From multicultural bedtime stories, to the 1% ‘of color’ at her independent high school, navigating life as a biracial adoptee has taken varying degrees of emotional investment and energy throughout her life. She is a blogger and thought-leader at Wreckage & Wonder. On today’s episode she gives valuable insight and understanding into the transracial adoption journey and what we can do, as parents, to better care for, and lead, our children. Listen to the episode now…

How To Help Your Children Advocate For Themselves

This post was written by Kristin Berry, (adoptive mom), with insight from S. Berry (adoptee.)

As parents, we spend a lot of time advocating for our children, and ensuring their needs are understood, and met. That’s a big part of our job. But we also must begin to teach our children to speak for themselves. How do we successfully do that?

Hello, my name is ~. I have an FASD, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. 

Some things are harder for me like focusing, sitting still and remembering things. 

I’m very good at some things like drawing, problem solving and building things. 

How To Successfully Advocate For Your Children

Your job as a parent is to make sure your children receive the best possible services. Whether this is within your school system, your pediatricians office, or your family therapist’s office. You do this because you care. But what do you do when you feel like you can’t adequately communicate the needs of your child?

You’ve probably experienced something like this when speaking to a professional:

“It doesn’t look like there’s anything wrong with him?”

“I understand you believe she has a special need, but she is a great student, well-liked, and makes good grades. We are not sure she needs any services.”

Why The Orphan Crisis Is Everyone’s Problem

The Honestly Adoption Podcast - Season 9, Episode 83

We hear it often: hundreds of thousands of children are without families, and homes, all over the world. Whose problem is this? What does that really have to do with us and what can we do about it?

On today’s episode of The Honestly Adoption Podcast, we talk openly with Think Orphan’s Phil Darke about why the orphan crisis is everyone’s problem. If you’ve ever wondered how you can be involved, beyond or in addition to foster care and adoption, this is an episode you won’t want to miss!

Listen Now:

How To Advocate For Your Child When No One Is Listening.

We get your frustration because we’ve been there many times in the past. We’ve walked out of doctor’s offices, IEP meetings, and counseling appointments defeated and mad. But we’ve discovered a few powerful truths about advocating for our child when it seems no one is listening…

Attention !

You sit in your car gripping your steering wheel so tight it’s causing your knuckles to turn white. The rush of blood to your head is making it hard to see. In your throat is a knot, and you grit your teeth so fiercely you may break a tooth. You’re mad. More than that, you’re done! Done with being talked down to, done with being disregarded as knowledgable, and done with trying to advocate for your child only to be dismissed constantly.