3 Key Questions To Ask When Your Child Is Acting Out

Often times, when our children are acting out, misbehaving, or out of control, we can fall into the mode of thinking they are just being bad. But there’s way more happening with them than we often understand. How do you gain the right perspective in those heated moments?

I know how this goes for most of you. You’re parenting a child who routinely acts out and sometimes there’s no rhyme or reason (or so it seems). They act like they have no control of their little bodies in public places. They’re aggressive toward other siblings (and it’s usually when you’re driving 75 miles an hour down an expressway). They meltdown over, what seems to be, meaningless things. They pester others in your household until everyone is out of control and severely dis-regulated. You name it!

How To Comfort A Child Who Doesn’t Want Connection

Our parenting instinct is to comfort, console, and care for our children when they are hurt, or feeling sad. But what do you do when your child pushes you away instead of letting you connect? It’s tricky, but here’s our advice…

I had just finished a stack of paperwork for my sons’ new school. Feeling relieved and a little bit cramped from signing my name a thousand times, I walked the envelopes to the end of our long driveway. (Yes, my kids’ school still uses paper and snail mail…rural living.) My son was pushing himself in the wagon toward the street. I turned just in time to see him veer toward the ledge separating the driveway from the grass. He swerved to the right, tipping himself out of the wagon and onto the hot asphalt. My instinct was to run to him. I spotted Mike at the back porch and could see him jump as fast as I did. We met our son just as he crawled out of the grass. Both of us walked toward him with arms outstretched. Mike said, “Oh no, let me see your arm.” I exclaimed, “You’re bleeding, is anything else hurt?” Our son turned away from us in anger, pushing us aside with his good arm and stomped toward the house. Still worried, we followed trying to offer the help of bandaids and ice packs. That’s when we realized, we were offering a consolation that he was not able to receive. 

Can You Really Ever Reach A Place Of Healing?

The answer is yes. Absolutely. You can. But it doesn’t happen in one day, overnight, or even in a year or two. We are wounded humans and we have the task of parenting children who have suffered deep wounds. It takes a lot of time. But healing is achievable. It happens step by step…

When I was a child, I planned to save the world. The whole entire world. In 4th grade, my teacher shared pictures of an ocean filled with plastic bottles and soda straws. I committed to recycle. When I was in 10th grade my ecology teacher warned us of the plight of the timber rattle snake. I promised to care for their habitat. When I was 12 my parents watched a documentary on the orphan crisis in impoverished countries. By the time I was 16, they adopted my youngest brother from Bulgaria. I would never again be unaware of the suffering in the world. I knew without a doubt that I would make a change. 

Foster Care And What I Feared Most For My Own Kids

The Honestly Adoption Podcast - Season 9, Episode 88

Will it disrupt their lives?  What about birth order?  Will it take away from time our kids are owed by us?  Is this going to make our kids feel pushed to the side?  If you have had these, or other concerns, for your biological kids when it comes to stepping into foster care,  you are not alone!

This week we are wrapping up Season 9 of The Honestly Adoption Podcast.  Be sure to listen in as Mike talks with Jason Johnson, author of Reframing Foster Care: Filtering Your Foster Parenting Journey through the Lens of the Gospel.  Jason shares honestly about the fears, and will encourage you to reframe how you think about how foster care might affect your biological children.

Listen Now:

What The US Government Fails To See With The ‘No-Tolerance’ Immigration Policy

Over the past 2 weeks we have had a lot of people in our audience reach out and ask us what our response is to the crisis at the border, where people are attempting to enter the U.S. from Mexico and being separated (mothers from children in particular) and not reunited. We have watched and processed for the past few weeks and can’t really wrap our heads and hearts around what has happened to these human beings. But, here’s what we have to say…

Disgusting.

Deplorable.

Un-American.

Wrong!

How To Create And Maintain A Safety Plan

The Honestly Adoption Podcast - Season 9, Episode 87

It could be for an intense situation with a child displaying sexual maladaptive behaviors or maybe a child acting out with volatile anger and you are needing to protect other children in your home. It might be a very basic plan for protecting children who have experienced trauma but aren’t displaying intense behaviors themselves. While the details and needs will vary, developing safety plans are a common need for many foster and adoptive families and we are talking about it today on the Honestly Adoption Podcast.

In today’s episode you will get a chance to listen to a replay of a live training that our host, Mike Berry, recently gave at Christian Alliance for Orphans Summit (CAFO) in 2018.    It may not be something you are looking forward to, but developing and maintaining a safety plan doesn’t have to be a negative experience.  Listen in for some tips and encouragement for getting this job done well.

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5 Tips To Help You Navigate Summer Break With Success

We are well into summer vacation now and for many parents, the struggle is real. Because of this, we thought it would be a good idea to give you some helpful tips when it comes to success with your kids.

I don’t have to tell you! You get it! Because this is your life! Anytime there’s a change in schedule, structure, or routine with kiddos from trauma, there are issues. Major issues, in fact. Can you say “Dysregulation City?” And summer break is the biggest culprit. While traditional families are planning all-day trips to the pool, staying up late in the backyard, and lounging around the house all day the following day, you’re banging your head against the wall trying to figure out how to make each day work, while fighting your own exhaustion.